/* ]]> */

Second Degree Heart Block- Type 2

 

Second-Degree (AV) Heart Block (Type 2)

Also called Mobitz II or Hay is a disease of the electrical conduction system of the heart. Second-degree AV block (Type 2) is almost always a disease of the distal conduction system located in the ventricular portion of the myocardium.

2nd Degree Block Type 2
This rhythm can be recognized by the following characteristics:

  1. non-conducted p-waves (electrical impulse conducts through the AV node but complete conduction through the ventricles is blocked, thus no QRS)
  2. P-waves are not preceded by PR prolongation as with second-degree AV block (Type 1)
  3. fixed PR interval
  4. The QRS complex will likely be wide click here to see why

Second-degree AV block (Type 2) is clinically significant for ACLS because this rhythm can rapidly progress to complete heart block

Second-degree AV block (Type 2) should be treated with immediate transcutaneous pacing or transvenous pacing because there is risk that electrical impulses will not be able to reach the ventricles and produce ventricular contraction.

Atropine may be attempted if immediate TCP is not available or time is needed to initiate TCP. Atropine should not be relied upon and in the case of myocardial ischemia it should be avoided.

Below is a short video which will help you quickly identify second-degree AV block type 2 on a monitor. Please allow several seconds for the video to load.

The QRS on an ECG will most likely be wide because the block occurs in the His bundle or bundle branches and conduction through the ventricles is slowed

  46 Responses to “Second Degree Heart Block- Type 2”

  1. I learned the difference between the two blocks as the second degree block type II the p waves and the qrs waves that are there are married
    In The third degree block the p waves and qrs are divorced (they do not stay together.)

  2. Thank you for the wonderful learning tool!

  3. I have been symptomatic for 3 years. My kidneys are starting to fail.
    I know this rhythm needs paced.
    I know this leads to 3rd degree block.
    I have an issue with the fact that I have tattoos seems to be more important to the cardio doc than my life.
    Video is great. I’m 2:1 ratio.
    Thank you

  4. I just love the music. So many different styles of learning on one page!! I also love the comments after. And Jeff from admin always signing of with, KINd regards!!! So pleasant. Great site!!

  5. Great review. I depart a bit from ACLS recs on advanced HB: atropine is likely to increase the atrial rate and, with infrahisian block, can actually decrease the ventricular response. Isoproteronol increases the escape (or ventricular rhythm).
    From an EPdoc

  6. The video by michelekunz was a big help.thx

  7. Having trouble differentiating between Mobitz II and third degree block.

    • The main difference is this:
      Mobitz II: There will be a p-wave with every QRS. There may not always be a QRS complex with every p-wave. The rate will usually be regular. Also, the PR interval will be regular.

      3rd Degree Block: There may not be a p-wave with each QRS. And the PR interval will not be the same with each PQRS.
      These videos may help you.
      They are kind of hard to hear but the content is good.
      Kind regards,
      Jeff

      • Thank you Jeff for the most comprehensive ACLS review that I have yet to see! You have made this nervous ICU nurse much more confident!

      • 3rd Degree, the top and the bottom parts of the heart are doing their own thing and “don’t talk to each other” and beat at their own rate, p’s are usually regular and QRS is regular, but usually at a slow ventricular rate.

        2nd Degree, the parties involved talk to each other most of the time, but not always.

    • It was put to me like this: a third degree heart block has no rhyme or reason to the p wave. They just pop up where they want to. No real relation to the QRS. Mobitz, however, the p wave is with a QRS, there just may be some QRS complexes missing. That helped me to understand :-)

      • Excellent explanation — I believe that was what I learned at my first ACLS certification. Thank you!

 Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)